2030 WRG in the News

Partnerships and innovative financing key to Tanzania’s water-smart future

NEWS SOURCE: The Guardian Tanzania

Tanzania meeting 22 Nov 16Dar es Salaam, 22 November 2016 — The annual 2030 WRG Tanzania Partnership meeting, held last week, closed with calls for increased partnership and innovative financing to propel Tanzania’s water-smart future. Sponsored by the Ministry of Water and Irrigation and supported by the 2030 WRG Tanzania Partnership, the meeting convened over 100 stakeholders from the public sector, private sector and civil society to discuss ways to collectively strengthen water resource management throughout the country.

Although Tanzania is not classified as a water stressed country, high rainfall variability regularly plunges some regions, central to the country’s economy, into severe seasonal drought. Increased demand on existing resources is further exacerbated by inefficient and rapid irrigation in addition to climate change.

The Ruaha River, for example, is drying up. More water than needed is abstracted, only 20 per cent of which is productive. Meanwhile, water sources in the Pangani Water Basin are already limited on per capita basis and future pressures are growing due to increased demand from commercial and urban water users.

In the face of these challenges, the government has been working to deliver a comprehensive water sector development strategy geared towards national objectives. Increased efficient workflows are helping utilities to better ensure sustainable water supply and sanitation, while more defined responsibilities within the Ministry of Water and waste water companies are driving enhancements. Newly established monitoring and advice mechanisms are further improving water quality and economically sound management practices.

Speaking about the country’s water resource management efforts, Eng Isack Kamwelwe, Deputy Minister for Water and Irrigation, praised 2030 WRG Tanzania partnerships related to the river basins of Pangani and Great Ruaha together with support for financing efficient irrigation for small-scale farmers. He stated: “Water is a crucial resource with great implications for socio-economic development. This partnership can play a major role in bringing positive results for water resource management.”

He especially commended the participation of private sector representatives in the partnership meeting and observed: “This shows how committed businesses are to join hands with the government, development partners and civil society to tackle water challenges facing the private sector and the nation at large.” Meeting participants discussed best practice and local success stories such as that of Serengeti Breweries and Olam’s Aviv Tanzania Coffee Plantation supported by partners such as Water Witness International and the Alliance for Water Stewardship.

Jane Joseph, an independent water resource management consultant, explained how civil society organisations are working with Serengeti Breweries to promote water stewardship standards through certification process supported by the partnership. She explained: “Serengeti Breweries have strong plans to reduce water usage in their processing systems. They have worked with Shahidiya Maji and Water Witness International to develop partnerships with other water users around their plants, especially in relation to groundwater challenges.”

The government is working with the public-private-civil society 2030 Water Resources Group Tanzania Partnership and the International Water Stewardship Programme to develop financing instruments for water-efficient smallholder agriculture in an effort to create funding for research, pilots and feasibility studies and promote international best practices from irrigation financing schemes.

Lucy Magembe, senior policy advisor at The Nature Conservancy civil society organisation, underlined the importance of having resources to tackle the water stress affecting both urban and rural areas: “We have to think about sustainable finance for water resource management. Smart finance mechanisms are key to funding initiatives for tackling water insecurity, supply challenges, growing demand and environmental degradation.”

Two new partnerships launched earlier this year—the Joint Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign and The Kilimanjaro Water Stewardship Platform—are further expected to contribute valuable solutions to the country’s water challenges in their respective regions.

The 2030 Water Resources Group is a global public-privatecivil society partnership with the goal to close the gap between water demand and supply by the year 2030.The 2030 WRG was invited in 2013 by the government of Tanzania to help strengthen water resource management through the development of a solution-oriented multistakeholder partnership. The Ministry of Water is driving the initiative along with senior members of the private sector and civil society. Global partners include bilateral agencies (such as Sida), private companies (including Nestlé, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola and SABMiller), development banks (such as the International Finance Corporation and the World Bank), international non-governmental organisations and income generation projects. The 2030 WRG was launched in 2008 at the World Economic Forum and has been hosted by IFC since 2012.

Business Daily: Working towards a water-smart future for Kenya

News Source: Business Daily
By PHYLLIS WAKIAGA
Posted  Tuesday, October 4   2016
wakiaga__working_towards_a_water-smart_future_for_kenya_-_opinion_and_analysis

Continued growth and investment in our country’s largest urban centres is placing an increasing strain on water and wastewater systems.

For example, water supply in Nairobi today is estimated to be 20 percent below total demand. If current trends continue, this deficit is expected to be more than 60 percent by 2035.

This supply-demand gap is driven in large part by population growth, but also by a rapidly growing demand for water for industry, which comprises more than one-fifth national gross domestic product.

In addition, pollution, flooding and wider land use practices in the surrounding catchment further strain the availability of existing clean water supply. Water is a critical input for industry.

In the beverage sector, for every litre of soda produced 2.5 litres of water is needed.

Meanwhile, coffee production requires 200 litres per kilogram of coffee processed. As Kenya aims to develop industry further by creating a competitive manufacturing sector, clean water resources will be needed to help it flourish.

As industrial water use is expected to rise by 125 percent between 2014 and 2030 alone, a collaborative approach is imperative to finding long-term sustainable solutions.

Companies across the world are realising that incorporating sustainable solutions into their business plans is not only socially responsible, but could also have financial benefits.

By addressing environmental and social issues companies can achieve better growth and cost savings; improve their brand and reputation; strengthen stakeholder relations, and boost their bottom lines.

Motivated by the aforementioned realities, local public, private and civil society organizations are joining forces in a new partnership-the Kenya Industrial Water Alliance (KIWA).

Spearheaded by the Kenya Association of Manufacturers and the Water Resources Management Authority, and supported jointly by the International Water Stewardship Programme and the Kenya 2030 Water Resources Group, KIWA provides an action-oriented platform for stakeholders to plan, design and implement activities that will increase water security in Kenya and initially in the Nairobi sub-catchment.

Nairobi’s water management success will be largely based on preserving existing resources. Of over 3,500 “known” boreholes located in Nairobi County less than half have abstraction permits, two-thirds are unmetered, and four in five users do not pay for water. Moving forward, improved regulation and monitoring of ground water abstraction, in addition to proper management of existing data will be essential to effective and sustainable management of the city’s available water resources.

Audits, for example, have shown that Kenyan manufacturers have an opportunity to reduce water use by 20 to 30 percent on average through cost-effective interventions.

We are carrying this out at subsidized rates and we have done ten pilot audits so far in the manufacturing sector.

The writer is CEO of Kenya Association of Manufacturers (KAM) and also chair of the Kenya Industrial Water Alliance (KIWA).

BIZNEWS: Solutions For A Water-Smart Future Realized

News Source: BIZNEWS

solutions_for_a_water-smart_future_realized_by_the_new_kenya_industrial_water_alliance___biznewsBy Phyllis Wakiaga

Continued growth and investment in our country’s largest urban centers is placing an increasing strain on water and wastewater systems. For example, water supply in Nairobi today is estimated to be 20 percent below total demand. If current trends continue, this deficit is expected to be more than 60 percent by 2035. This supply-demand gap is driven in large part by population growth, but also by a rapidly growing demand for water for industry, which comprises more than one-fifth national gross domestic product. In addition, pollution, flooding and wider land use practices in the surrounding catchment further strain the availability of  existing clean water supply.

Water is a critical input for industry. In the beverage sector, for every litre of soda produced 2.5 litres of water is needed. Meanwhile, coffee production requires 200 litres per kilogram of coffee processed As Kenya aims to develop industry further by creating a competitive manufacturing sector, clean water resources will be needed to help it flourish.

As industrial water use is expected to rise by 125 percent between 2014 and 2030 alone, a collaborative approach is  imperative to finding long-term sustainable solutions.

Towards a Water-Smart Industrial Future

Companies across the world are realizing that incorporating sustainable solutions into their business plans is not only socially responsible, but could also have financial benefits. By addressing environmental and social issues companies can achieve better growth and cost savings; improve their brand and reputation; strengthen stakeholder relations, and boost their bottom lines.

Motivated by the aforementioned realities, local public, private and civil society organizations are joining forces in a new partnership—the Kenya Industrial Water Alliance, also known as KIWA.

Spearheaded by the Kenya Association of Manufacturers and the Water Resources Management Authority, and supported jointly by the International Water Stewardship Programme and the Kenya 2030 Water Resources Group, KIWA provides an action-oriented platform for stakeholders to plan, design and implement activities that will increase water security in Kenya and initially in the Nairobi sub-catchment.

Initiatives like this provide hope for urban communities who in the past have suffered due to pollution associated with industrial expansion. These grievances are felt at home and across the globe, China’s largest cities, for example, have seen increases in air pollution, contaminated drinking water, water shortages, marine pollution, and deforestation. Meanwhile, addressing supply and pollution challenges is costing the Bangladeshi capital of Dhaka US $700 million per year as the country as a whole has assumed an estimated annual US $7 billion in economic losses from unimproved water and sanitation.

KIWA will help mitigate these problems, allowing government and industry to learn from both local and international best practices, while promoting a regulatory environment that encourages and incentivizes water efficiency, treatment and reuse.

Nairobi’s water management success will be largely based on preserving existing resources. Of over 3,500 “known” boreholes located in Nairobi County less than half have abstraction permits, two-thirds are unmetered, and four in five users do not pay for water. Moving forward, improved regulation and monitoring of ground water abstraction, in addition to proper management of existing data will be essential to effective and sustainable management of the city’s available water resources.

Audits, for example, have shown that Kenyan manufacturers have an opportunity to reduce water use by 20 to 30 percent on average through cost-effective interventions. KAM is already supporting the manufacturing sector to migrate into better use of water through such water and waste water resource audits. We are carrying this out at subsidized rates and we have done ten pilot audits so far in the manufacturing sector.

Meanwhile, alliance members are also doing their part. Nairobi-based Textile Company, Spinners and Spinners has already invested in systems to reuse 40 percent of its wastewater, reducing the risks to their business from water shortages, ensuring the sustainability of their water resource and providing an example for others to follow.

Working together we will be able to effectively mainstream smart-water practices into our standard organizational processes because we realize that sustainable business is good business.

 The writer is the CEO of the Kenya Association of Manufacturers and the Chair of the Kenya Industrial Water Alliance. She can be reached on ceo@kam.co.ke

The Citizen: Water resources at the heart of SDGs

News Source: The Citizen, newspaper TanzaniaTanzania_EngSayi_TheCitizen_oped_2016.07.16

Op-ed by Engineer Sayi, Saturday, July 16th, 2016. The author is chairman of the National Water Board and the Tanzania 2030 Water Resources Group partnership.

Dar es Salaam will host to the 6th Africa Water Week from July 18 to 22. It will attract government leaders and other stakeholders from across the continent to increase political commitment and develop solutions to the continent’s water and sanitation challenges.

This year, the Africa Water Week will focus on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This United Nations sponsored effort aims to create a common set of development targets for all countries. It is reassuring to see that water and sanitation feature prominently as SDG6. Furthermore, when we compare the SDGs to the UN’s previous Millennium Development Goals, initiated in 2000 to rally the world around a 15-year agenda to tackle poverty, we also see a notable shift towards issues of water resources and water security. This is in addition to the continued, critical focus on increasing basic access to water and sanitation services.

This is a welcome and important shift. Population growth, economic growth and climate change are placing a growing strain on water resources not just  in Africa but across the world. Globally, we face an estimated 40 percent gap between water supply and water demand by 2030. Our agriculture, our industry, our energy, our tourism, all rely on water resources, which too often are taken for granted. As American statesman Benjamin Franklin said over 200 years ago, it is only when the well is dry, that we know the worth of water. Hence, the SDGs provide a welcome reminder of the importance of water for all aspects of our economic development.

With 2,300 cubic metres of water per capita, Tanzania does not lack water. What we lack are the systems and infrastructure to store and efficiently utilize water. Over 80 per cent of the rain that falls in Tanzania is never touched for any productive or social purpose. In areas where economic activity – and particularly agriculture – has developed more intensively, the challenges of low storage and inefficiency are resulting in water resources being stretched to their environmental limits.

This creates risks for a diverse mix of water-using stakeholders, including commercial agribusinesses, smallholder farmers, hydropower providers, industries, pastoralists, wildlife reserves, municipal water providers and communities. Yet, as the risks grow, so does the understanding of the need to work together, across sectors and stakeholder groups, to find common solutions to the water challenge.

One important recent effort to address this challenge is through the Tanzania 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) partnership, which brings together stakeholders to find joint solutions to the country’s water challenges. As chairman of this partnership, I have observed the alignment of interest between government, the private sector and civil society on the issue of water resource management.

This alignment creates opportunities for innovative joint solutions. To give one example, in the north of Tanzania we recently launched a Kilimanjaro Water Stewardship Platform. This initiative is uniting the Pangani Basin Water Office together with actors from the horticulture and sugar industry, development partners, NGOs and others, to develop, coordinate and scale up solutions to tackle the growing water resource challenges in the Pangani basin.

Another example is in the irrigation sector, where we are building a partnership to increase access to finance for water-smart irrigation technologies. More than 95 per cent of smallholder farmers in Tanzania do not have access to irrigation, and almost all that do use inefficient surface irrigation which is bad for yields and water sustainability. Together with the National Irrigation Commission and the Financial Services Deepening Trust, we have brought together a together with a group of irrigation suppliers, agriculture companies, financial services providers and other agriculture organizations to develop solutions that can increase our agricultural productivity while using less water.

As host, Africa Water Week provides us with a wonderful opportunity to showcase these positive experiences with our neighbors, as well as to learn from the experiences of countries in the region that face similar water resource challenge to ourselves. The Sustainable Development Goals are our goals, and our public sector bodies, our companies and our civil society must join hands if we are to succeed in achieving them.

 

East African Business Week: River protection starts in Tanzania

News Source: East African Business Week

By Timothy Kitundu, Monday, June 20th, 2016

DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA – A major multi-stakeholder initiative to improve water management in the Great Ruaha River has been launched during a recent workshop to review supply and demand challenges in the catchment area. 

The Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign (GRRC) brings together stakeholders impacted by water stress from across the public sector, private sector and civil society, to find collective solutions to water challenges in the basin.

The Rufiji Basin Water Board in collaboration with CEO Round Table of Tanzania, SAGCOT Centre, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Tanzania and 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) Tanzania Partnership held the workshop in Iringa town (500km from Dar es Salaam) to review and endorse the concept of the initiative.

The GRRC will be based on the long-awaited Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub-basin. This plan, promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and other resources.

The plan, led by Tanzania’s Ministry of Water and Irrigation with the Rufiji Basin Water Board, aims to bring about a cultural change in the way water is managed and used in a sustainable way.

“This Campaign will unite stakeholders in a co-ordinated, action-oriented coalition to find solutions to the basin’s water challenges,” said Onesmo Sigalla 2030 WRG Country Representative.

He also added that that the campaign aimed to enable the private sector to work alongside government and civil society groups to identify, discuss and address current and future water supply and demand challenges.

The campaign will share lessons from effective water stewardship projects inside or outside the catchment in order to promote, replicate and scale-up successful initiatives. This will be accompanied by project proposal development, financing, implementation and monitoring support.

The ‘collective action’ approach of the discussions to kick-start the initiative was endorsed by Eng. Emmanuel Kalobelo, Assistant Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, when launching the Campaign.

He observed: ‘Business caHe further commended 2030 WRG for mobilising stakeholders to develop credible interventions and coordinate existing plans to restore the flow of the Great Ruaha.

The Great Ruaha River Catchment is of high significance to the national economy. The region contains 50% of the country’s installed hydropower. In addition it hosts the largest National Park in the country with the largest number of Elephants (up to 20,000), highest number of bird species (about 4,000 species) and a steadily growing tourist turnover.

All Africa: Tanzania – Plans Underway to Boost Water Catchment Areas

News Source: allAfrica (Tanzania Daily News)

A major multi stakeholder initiative to improve water management in the Great Ruaha River has been launched to review supply and demand challenges in the catchment area, which is a vital part of the national economy.

According to a statement, the Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign (GRRC) brings together stakeholders impacted by water stress from across the public sector, private sector and civil society, to find collective solutions to water challenges in the basin.

The initiative, led by the 2030 Water Resources Group (WRG) in partnership with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation and the Rufiji Basin Water Board, aims to bring about a cultural change in the way water is managed and used in a sustainable way.

“This campaign will unite stakeholders in a coordinated, action-oriented coalition to find solutions to the basin’s water challenges,” the 2030 WRG Country Representative, Mr Onesmo Sigalla said.

The Rufiji Basin Water Board in collaboration with CEO Round Table of Tanzania, SAGCOT Centre, World Wildlife Fund Tanzania and 2030 WRG Tanzania Partnership held a workshop recently in Iringa town to review and endorse the concept of the initiative.

The GRRC will be based on the long-awaited Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub-basin. This plan promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and other resources.

Mr Sigalla said that the campaign aimed at enabling the private sector to work alongside government and civil society groups to identify, discuss and address current and future water supply and demand challenges.

The campaign will share lessons from effective water stewardship projects inside or outside the catchment in order to promote, replicate and scale-up successful initiatives. This will be accompanied by project proposal development, financing, implementation and monitoring support.

The ‘collective action’ approach of the discussions to kick-start the initiative was endorsed by Eng Emmanuel Kalobelo, the Assistant Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, when launching the campaign.

He observed: “Business can play a major role by being a key voice in the debate alongside government, civil society and academia,” Eng Kalobelo reflected that every person living in Tanzania has now witnessed water stress and has ‘a story to tell’ about its effects. He further commended 2030 WRG for mobilising stakeholders to develop credible interventions and coordinate existing plans to restore the flow of the Great Ruaha.

The 2-day launch event in Iringa town identified the interests and capacities of more than 70 stakeholders. The emerging campaign leadership will now work with supporters to determine priority action areas and working groups.

The 2030 Water Resources Group is a unique, public-private-civil society collaboration that facilitates open, trust-based dialogue processes to drive action on water resources reform in water stressed countries in developing economies.

The ultimate aim of such reforms and actions is to close the gap between water demand and supply by the year 2030. The 2030 WRG emerged in 2009 through a collaboration between the IFC, the World Economic Forum, multilateral and bilateral agencies (Swiss and Swedish Development Cooperation), private sector companies (Nestlé, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, SABMiller), and other organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund.

The Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub basin were compiled to inform the discussions of the 2030 WRG and support the Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign.

The plan, presented to the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, has assessed the resource availability and demand both in historic time and future projection to 2035. The plan indicates five strategic focus areas: water for social development, water for economic development, disaster risk management, environmental conservation and water governance.

The Guardian (IPP Media): Setting a new catchment-level to restore the Great Ruaha

News Source: The Guardian (IPP Media)

 

THE Great Ruaha River and its catchment area are critical to Tanzania’s economy.

By DEO MFUGALE

The catchment has the potential to produce 50 per cent of Tanzania’s installed hydroelectric power and accounts for about 40 per cent of rice produced in the country, not to mention some of the highest food-producing regions in the country – Mbeya, Njombe and Iringa.

 

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The Citizen: Learning from Ruaha

News Source: The Citizen

Ruaha_TheCitizenTanzania

The challenge facing the Ruaha is illustrative of the rationale for the establishment of the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) Tanzania Partnership. We bring together stakeholders impacted by water stress, from across the public sector, private sector, and civil society, to find collective solutions that are essential for the management of common resources such as water.

By Will Davies, Onesmo Sigalla, Neema Ndikumwami

Dar es Salaam. It is a testament of the wealth of Tanzania’s environment riches that a national park of 20,000 square kilometers – half the size of the Netherlands – and home to 10,000 elephants, can remain relatively unknown outside of the region. This is the case with the Ruaha National Park.

In fact, even fewer overseas visitors would have heard of the Ruaha were it not for the fact that the Greater Ruaha river, the livelihood of the park, has been drying up. Historically, this 300-mile river would consistently flow year round, but in 1993 the river dried up for the first time for three weeks. By 1999 this had reached three months, and by 2013 dry spells were even being reported even during the wet season.

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Daily News: Initiative to tackle Arusha’s water challenges launched

News Source: Daily News

DAILY NEWS REPORTER

A MAJOR Water Stewardship Leadership Forum, held in Arusha, has seen the launch of new initiatives to tackle the region’s spiralling water challenges.

The multi-stakeholder Kilimanjaro Water Stewardship Platform provides organisations from across the public sector, private sector and civil society with a mechanism to develop, coordinate and scale up solutions to tackle the growing water resource challenges in the Pangani River Basin.

It was formally launched by the Minister of Water and Irrigation Gerson Lwenge together with Mr Anders Berntell, Executive Director of the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG).

“I am particularly inspired that there is a deliberate effort to engage the private sector in managing water resources,” Lwenge said, adding that he was passionate about the Platform’s collective action approach. The landmark forum also included a master-class for water leaders from across Africa.

The three day regional event drew upon lessons generated by innovative work undertaken by Diageo and Serengeti Breweries Limited to implement ‘the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) standard’ which represents international best practice on water management – at their Moshi site.

The platform is designed to promote practical solutions in areas such as increasing the productivity of water use in agriculture, developing and scaling up partnerships for improved catchment management, and promoting the uptake of the AWS stewardship standards.

The initiative’s co-ordinator, Onesmo Sigalla, was equally supportive of setting a progressive agenda to maximise water stewardship’s contribution to sustainable development by joining businesses with government and civil society efforts.

“The launch of this platform is critical to ensure that economic growth in the region is not constrained by water security issues, and to demonstrate the potential for the private sector to drive wider sustainable water stewardship,” said Sigalla.

The Leadership Forum highlighted specific water stewardship efforts in the region, including implementation of the AWS Standard by Serengeti Breweries, with support from Shahidi wa Maji, Water Witness International, and the Scottish Government.

This work is helping the company to manage the water and climate risks facing their brewery and its supply chain. The implementation of the new standard was used as a hands-on case study at a ‘Water Stewardship Masterclass’, an advanced training for practitioners, held during the event.

Sustainability and Responsibility Manager for Serengeti Breweries Limited, Ms Hawa Ladha underlined the company’s commitment to the initiative and explained: “By being one of the first African companies to implement the AWS’ Standard we are making a strong, public commitment towards the need for better water management in the region”. Almost twenty organisations have already indicated their commitment to actively participate.

Founding members include the Pangani Basin Water Board, Tanzania Horticulture Association (TAHA), 2030 WRG and the International Water Stewardship Programme (IWASP).

The Pangani River Basin is home to a large number of commercial agriculture producers (in particular coffee and sugar) and has the largest concentration of horticulture and floriculture producers in Tanzania – with over 30 companies in the region identified as exporting to European markets.

The Pangani is also globally recognised for its forest and biodiversity resources which generates an estimated US$50 million alone in revenue each year for the Tanzanian economy. The river basin is already water stressed, and evidence suggests its resources will become increasingly constrained.