Karnataka, India: Creating a Sustainable Water Future for Karnataka – Urban and Industrial Sector

Creating a sustainable future for Karnataka – urban and industrial sectorAs a result of population growth, per capita water availability for Karnataka has been declining such that the state could be classified as experiencing “water stress.” The growing gap between supply and demand for water is forcing the state to find new ways of achieving higher growth without using more water.

In this context, the 2030 WRG and the Government of Karnataka have partnered to understand the scale and nature of this challenge and to identify solutions for addressing it. This report is an important milestone in this partnership, and it contains a detailed analysis of the growing demand-supply gap for water in urban and industrial sectors by 2030. It also identifies various solutions as well as institutional, policy, and regulatory changes required to enable the implementation of these solutions. We hope that this report would be instrumental in bringing all stakeholders to the table for a meaningful discussion and concrete action on water sector reform.

Read or download the full report »

Collective Action towards Water Enabled Growth in India

WP_20141104_008“The 2030 Water Resources Group and the World Economic Forum (WEF) collaborated to organize a private session on Collective Action towards Water Enabled Growth in India on Tuesday Nov. 4 in New Delhi. The session was moderated by Mr. Anil B. Jain, Managing Director, Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd. Anders Berntell, executive director of the 2030 WRG show cased their multi-stakeholder approach in India and across the globe.

Panel members were Dr. S.K. Goel (Additional Chief Secretary, Department of Agriculture, Government of Maharashtra), Etienne Benet (Managing Director, Nestle India) and Arunabha Ghosh (CEO, Council on Energy, Environment and Water), representing government, private sector, civil society and development agencies respectively.

The round table discussions were framed by Dr. Amarjit Singh (Additional Secretary, Ministry of Water Resources, Government of India) who called for private sector involvement in the government’s Ganga Rejuvenation initiative. A lively round table discussion then focussed on challenges and opportunities for multi-stakeholder involvement in the Ganga river basin. Consensus seems to build up that government, private sector and civil society need to hold hands to make the Ganga clean-up successful.”

South African Minister of Water and Sanitation Nomvula Mokonyane strengthens relations with business

South African Minister Mokonyane

South African Minister Mokonyane

The Minister of Water and Sanitation, Ms. Nomvula Mokonyane yesterday met with the leadership team of the public – private sector led multi-stakeholder platform called the Strategic Water Partners Network (SWPN).

Minister Mokonyane emphasised that water management should be driven by national objectives such as job creation, eliminating inequality and reducing poverty. The Minister offered her full support to the SWPN, emphasising that the partnership has the value of being a two-way sounding board that both the DWS and the corporate sector should use to improve the country’s water management.

The SWPN was launched in late November 2011 by the former Minister with the help of the World Economic Forum and the 2030 Water Resources Group. Since then it has transformed itself from an engagement forum of a small leading group of pathfinders to a robust functional multi-stakeholder partnership that is inspiring other sectors, other countries and starting to achieve significant results on the ground.

In his presentation of SWPN projects, Andre Fourie, Co-Chair of the SWPN and Head of Environmental Value at SABMiller, said that the rallying point of this public-private-civil society partnership was to develop and to bring to scale projects that would close a 17% national gap between water supply and demand that is projected for the year 2030. Mr Fourie added that driven by this goal, the SWPN is a collaborative space where the public and private sector work together to develop solutions to address current water management challenges. He further acknowledged that the success of this partnership is owed to continued political leadership from the department.

Ravi Pillay of Nestle talked about the No Drop programme that was developed by the SWPN and is now being implemented by the Department of Water and Sanitation. The programme has developed a regulatory and partnership strategy, as well as tools to incentivise a reduction in water losses (leaks, meter problems and theft) in municipalities from the current 32% to 18% by 2025. This result will save the country over R2.5 billion in annual revenue that would otherwise have been lost from municipal water systems.

On the issue of water quality challenges related to mine impacted waters, Nandha Govender from Eskom spoke about how the SWPN is providing guidance on planning for mining and water management at wider scales beyond individual mine facilities.

In the area of agricultural water, Ian Hirschfeld of Coca-Cola said that the SWPN is developing a business case to enhance private sector investment in the rehabilitation of the Vaalharts irrigation scheme, the largest in South Africa. The project has the dual objective of improving productivity and water access to new farmers.

The work was appreciated by the new DWS Director-General (DG), Ms Margaret-Ann Diedricks. The DG also recommended that the partnership, in addition to municipal water reduction, looks at industrial water use efficiency as well. She then committed that the Department will assign relevant senior members to be involved to ensure continued success of this partnership.

Minister Mokonyane concluded that she saw great potential in the SWPN, saying that an open, long lasting and robust relationship between the private sector and the department including its entities is essential for addressing water security and national development goals. She provided some guidance to the SWPN leadership with regard to additional issues that include addressing sanitation, direct interaction with community groups, and the role of the private sector in financing infrastructure.

Financial support for the SWPN is provided by the following organisations: the 2030 Water Resources Group, Absa, Anglo American, BHP Billiton, Coca-Cola, the Department of Water and Sanitation, Eskom, Exxaro, GIZ, Nestle, Sasol and South African Breweries. The NEPAD Business Foundation hosts the SWPN Secretariat.

For more information contact:
Sputnik Ratau
Cell: 082 874 2942

The SWPN Secretariat
Tel: +27 10 596 1888/1893
E-mail: swpn.secretariat@thenbf.co.za

Delivering access to safe water through partnerships

PepsiCo joint water publication

We are excited to have joined hands with PepsiCo in jointly launching the Report “Delivering access to safe water through partnerships”. It illustrates various ways partnerships leverage support to enable creative new strategies that achieve measurable and sustainable progress in the fight to alleviate water insecurity and provide access to safe water.

This includes water conservation, distribution, purification and hygiene for underserved communities in China, India, Mali, Brazil, Colombia and other Latin American countries.

See the report »

Collective Action for Water Security and Sustainability: Preliminary Investigations

 Collective Action for Water Security and SustainabilityThe 2030 WRG requested the Council on Energy, Environment, and Water to develop a framework for effective collaborative action in water management at the (sub) river basin level. This led to a contribution to the national and global dialogue about shared water risks and multi-stakeholder water stewardship. Evidence shows that such collaborative efforts are not yet common practice, not just in India, but also elsewhere. This study determines success and failure factors and effective tools or mechanisms to facilitate multi-stakeholder engagement processes in India based on the identified global and domestic case studies.

Read or download the full study » 

Water Partnership for South Africa Launched at the World Economic Forum on Africa

By Desirée Mohindra
  • Water demand set to rise by 52% within the next 30 years in South Africa
  • South Africa joins the governments of Jordan, Mexico and the State of Karnataka in India as a partner with the Water Resources Group

Cape Town, South Africa  At the World Economic Forum on Africa in Cape Town, Minister of Water and Environmental Affairs of South Africa Edna Molewa, Chairman of Nestlé and Chairman of the Water Resources Group Peter Brabeck-Letmathe announced today a Declaration of Partnership. Recognizing the critical role that water plays as a catalyst for both economic growth and social development, the Department of Water Affairs (DWA) of South Africa forges a partnership with the Water Resources Group (WRG), an influential public-private global network on water supported by the World Economic Forum and the International Finance Corporation. This new public-private group, chaired by the director-general of the DWA, will oversee the activities of a partnership called “South Africa Strategic Water Partners Network” to address critical water issues in South Africa: water conservation, demand management and developing more sustainable management of groundwater resources.

“This new partnership between the Government of South Africa and the Water Resources Group will help identify how South Africa’s plans for growth can be met with the water it has safely available. The foresight and leadership of Minister Molewa in this regard should be applauded” remarked Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, Chairman of Nestlé and Chairman of the Water Resources Group.

In South Africa, water demand is expected to rise by 52% within the next 30 years while the supply of water is sharply declining. If current trends of leakage from aged and poorly maintained municipal infrastructure and the loss of wetlands persist, this growth in demand will intensify competition for water resources across all sectors of the economy (agriculture, energy industry and domestic). Should status quo in management practices remain, a gap of 17% between water demand and supply is forecast by 2030. This gap will have serious social and political implications and strongly impact South Africa’s plans for economic growth.

“The Water Resources Group partnership will enable South Africa to access best practice economics, projects and policies in water management from public, private and civil society sectors around the world, enabling officials to field-test and replicate actions for implementation domestically,” explained Dominic Waughray, Senior Director, Head of Environmental Initiatives at the World Economic Forum, and member of the Water Resources Group.

The group will focus on key areas:

  • Water conservation and demand management: increasing water use efficiency (in agriculture, industry and households) and reducing leakage from distribution networks (municipal and others, including irrigation)
  • Diversifying the water mix: increasing the reuse of effluent and desalination (sea water and acid mine drainage), and developing more sustainable management of groundwater resources, in particular for rural areas

The partnership will deliver two primary outputs: first, it will assist the Department of Water Affairs (DWA) in developing sector strategies (agriculture, energy, industry) related to the key areas. Each sector strategy will:

  • Identify a pipeline of potential projects and access its collective potential to close the water volume gap if implementation takes place
  • Identify challenges for project replication
  • Recommend a strategy to overcome challenges, including incentives for widespread adoption and contributions by each stakeholder to enable replication

Second, the partnership will provide expert support to help the NEPAD Business Foundation (NBF) consult with domestic stakeholders and design these pilot projects. Expertise provided from the WRG network will help NBF to:

  • Develop joint public-private expert collaborations to structure and take forward the pilot projects
  • Highlight the DWA-WRG partnership at COP 17 in Durban as a practical example of what South Africa is doing to manage its water security and adapt to climate change

Clear government ownership of the process is crucial to success and the inclusion of domestic public and private stakeholders. To this end, a public-private expert leadership group, chaired by the director-general of the DWA, will be formed to oversee the work. This new group will formally be called the “South Africa Strategic Water Partners Network”. Stakeholders to be invited will include:

  • Department of Water Affairs (chairperson: the director-general)
  • Industry (key economic sectors such as food/beverage, mining and metals, energy)
  • Other governmental departments (national treasury, national planning commission, local government)
  • Development finance institutions (Development Bank of Southern Africa, Industrial Development Corporation, International Finance Corporation)
  • Business organizations (NEPAD Business Foundation (NBF), Business Unity South Africa (BUSA), Business Leadership South Africa (BLSA), National Business Initiative (NBI)
  • Civil society organizations (including WWF South Africa)
  • Multilateral and bilateral development agencies working in South Africa
  • A senior representative of WRG

Key partners of the WRG include The Coca-Cola Company, International Finance Corporation, Nestlé, PepsiCo, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and Veolia Environment. The Water Resources Group (WRG) is a public-private platform for collaboration. It mobilizes stakeholders from the public and private sector, civil society, centres of academic expertise and financing institutions to engage in fact-based, analytical approaches and coalition building initiatives that help governments to catalyse sustainable water sector transformation in support of their economic growth plans. WRG engages with those governments who invite it to work on a comprehensive water sector reform strategy and then it provides a public-private approach to support them.

Notes to Editors

For more on Water Resources Group (WRG) go to http://www.weforum.org/issues/water

Read the Declaration of Partnership

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Wasser-Alternativen

Die DEZA ist finanziell und personell eng mit globalen Wasserprivatisierungsoffensiven von
Nestlé & Co. verknüpft. Dabei liesse die in der Schweiz praktizierte Wasserbewirtschaftung
eine enge Kooperation mit öffentlichen Wasserversorgern in Lateinamerika erwarten.

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FT series; A world without water

In the first installment of a series on the threat of water scarcity, Pilita Clarck describes the cost to companies.

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Tanzania: Hydro-Economic Overview – An Initial Analysis

Prioritizing Tanzania’s River BasinsThis report presents recommendations to prioritize Tanzanian river basins for further hydro-economic analysis. The work is part of a program undertaken by the 2030 WRG to inform and accelerate sustainable transformation in the water sector to support economic growth. This study includes a national overview of the magnitude and urgency of the country’s water challenges, and a review of two river basins: the Wami Ruvu (includes Dar es Salaam, the largest urban center in Tanzania) and the Rufiji river basin (the focus area of the government’s Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania investment program).

Read or download the full report »

Water shortage shuts Coca-Cola plant in India

A Coca-Cola bottling plant has been ordered to close in northern India after local farmers blamed it for using too much water, creating fresh headaches for the world’s biggest soft drinks marker in one of its most important markets.

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