Hindon Yatra: A Multi-Stakeholder Journey Towards River Rejuvenation

The Hindon Yatra documents the journey of the river Hindon and its people from its source in the Shivalik hills of Western Uttar Pradesh as it traverses almost 400 kilometers downstream to merge with the Yamuna. The Yatra is the culmination of a stakeholder mapping exercise conducted by the 2030 WRG India program in 2015 to 2016 to assess the current levels of pollution in the Hindon river as well as numerous efforts to revive the Hindon. We conducted literature reviews, field visits, and focused group discussions with local government, industries, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and academia working along the banks of the Hindon.

The Hindon Yatra Handbook is the result of collaborative efforts of the 2030 WRG, the Government of Uttar Pradesh (particularly the Irrigation and Water Resources Department and local administration), industries, research institutes, and communities involved in the rejuvenation of the Hindon River. The case studies presented provide a ray of hope by showcasing work already being undertaken by the state government, NGOs, lawyers, activists, private sector, and research organizations to address the many challenges.

Read or download the full handbook here »

Mongolia: Prioritized solutions to close the water gap: Hydro-economic analysis on the coal mining regions in Mongolia’s Gobi desert

Hydro-economic analysis on the coal mining regions in Mongolia’s Gobi desertEconomic development in Mongolia puts a strain on the water resources in areas where demand for water requires large water supplies. Hence, in some cases, water is not only a limiting factor for economic growth and development, but also an opportunity. The focus of this analysis lies in the coal mining regions Tavan Tolgoi and Nyalga Shivee Ovoo, in which many investments in coal value-adding technologies are planned. This study assesses the water demand-supply gap by 2040 in each region and prioritizes implementable solutions to close the gap to allow for sustainable economic development.

Read or download the full report »

East African Business Week: River protection starts in Tanzania

News Source: East African Business Week

By Timothy Kitundu, Monday, June 20th, 2016

DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA – A major multi-stakeholder initiative to improve water management in the Great Ruaha River has been launched during a recent workshop to review supply and demand challenges in the catchment area. 

The Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign (GRRC) brings together stakeholders impacted by water stress from across the public sector, private sector and civil society, to find collective solutions to water challenges in the basin.

The Rufiji Basin Water Board in collaboration with CEO Round Table of Tanzania, SAGCOT Centre, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Tanzania and 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) Tanzania Partnership held the workshop in Iringa town (500km from Dar es Salaam) to review and endorse the concept of the initiative.

The GRRC will be based on the long-awaited Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub-basin. This plan, promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and other resources.

The plan, led by Tanzania’s Ministry of Water and Irrigation with the Rufiji Basin Water Board, aims to bring about a cultural change in the way water is managed and used in a sustainable way.

“This Campaign will unite stakeholders in a co-ordinated, action-oriented coalition to find solutions to the basin’s water challenges,” said Onesmo Sigalla 2030 WRG Country Representative.

He also added that that the campaign aimed to enable the private sector to work alongside government and civil society groups to identify, discuss and address current and future water supply and demand challenges.

The campaign will share lessons from effective water stewardship projects inside or outside the catchment in order to promote, replicate and scale-up successful initiatives. This will be accompanied by project proposal development, financing, implementation and monitoring support.

The ‘collective action’ approach of the discussions to kick-start the initiative was endorsed by Eng. Emmanuel Kalobelo, Assistant Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, when launching the Campaign.

He observed: ‘Business caHe further commended 2030 WRG for mobilising stakeholders to develop credible interventions and coordinate existing plans to restore the flow of the Great Ruaha.

The Great Ruaha River Catchment is of high significance to the national economy. The region contains 50% of the country’s installed hydropower. In addition it hosts the largest National Park in the country with the largest number of Elephants (up to 20,000), highest number of bird species (about 4,000 species) and a steadily growing tourist turnover.

All Africa: Tanzania – Plans Underway to Boost Water Catchment Areas

News Source: allAfrica (Tanzania Daily News)

A major multi stakeholder initiative to improve water management in the Great Ruaha River has been launched to review supply and demand challenges in the catchment area, which is a vital part of the national economy.

According to a statement, the Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign (GRRC) brings together stakeholders impacted by water stress from across the public sector, private sector and civil society, to find collective solutions to water challenges in the basin.

The initiative, led by the 2030 Water Resources Group (WRG) in partnership with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation and the Rufiji Basin Water Board, aims to bring about a cultural change in the way water is managed and used in a sustainable way.

“This campaign will unite stakeholders in a coordinated, action-oriented coalition to find solutions to the basin’s water challenges,” the 2030 WRG Country Representative, Mr Onesmo Sigalla said.

The Rufiji Basin Water Board in collaboration with CEO Round Table of Tanzania, SAGCOT Centre, World Wildlife Fund Tanzania and 2030 WRG Tanzania Partnership held a workshop recently in Iringa town to review and endorse the concept of the initiative.

The GRRC will be based on the long-awaited Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub-basin. This plan promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and other resources.

Mr Sigalla said that the campaign aimed at enabling the private sector to work alongside government and civil society groups to identify, discuss and address current and future water supply and demand challenges.

The campaign will share lessons from effective water stewardship projects inside or outside the catchment in order to promote, replicate and scale-up successful initiatives. This will be accompanied by project proposal development, financing, implementation and monitoring support.

The ‘collective action’ approach of the discussions to kick-start the initiative was endorsed by Eng Emmanuel Kalobelo, the Assistant Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, when launching the campaign.

He observed: “Business can play a major role by being a key voice in the debate alongside government, civil society and academia,” Eng Kalobelo reflected that every person living in Tanzania has now witnessed water stress and has ‘a story to tell’ about its effects. He further commended 2030 WRG for mobilising stakeholders to develop credible interventions and coordinate existing plans to restore the flow of the Great Ruaha.

The 2-day launch event in Iringa town identified the interests and capacities of more than 70 stakeholders. The emerging campaign leadership will now work with supporters to determine priority action areas and working groups.

The 2030 Water Resources Group is a unique, public-private-civil society collaboration that facilitates open, trust-based dialogue processes to drive action on water resources reform in water stressed countries in developing economies.

The ultimate aim of such reforms and actions is to close the gap between water demand and supply by the year 2030. The 2030 WRG emerged in 2009 through a collaboration between the IFC, the World Economic Forum, multilateral and bilateral agencies (Swiss and Swedish Development Cooperation), private sector companies (Nestlé, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, SABMiller), and other organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund.

The Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub basin were compiled to inform the discussions of the 2030 WRG and support the Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign.

The plan, presented to the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, has assessed the resource availability and demand both in historic time and future projection to 2035. The plan indicates five strategic focus areas: water for social development, water for economic development, disaster risk management, environmental conservation and water governance.

The Guardian (IPP Media): Setting a new catchment-level to restore the Great Ruaha

News Source: The Guardian (IPP Media)

 

THE Great Ruaha River and its catchment area are critical to Tanzania’s economy.

By DEO MFUGALE

The catchment has the potential to produce 50 per cent of Tanzania’s installed hydroelectric power and accounts for about 40 per cent of rice produced in the country, not to mention some of the highest food-producing regions in the country – Mbeya, Njombe and Iringa.

 

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2030 Water Resources Group and Kenya Join Forces to Close Gap Between Water Supply and Demand

PRESS RELEASE

Engineer J. M Maina, Director of Water Services for the Laikipia County Government, at the Nanyuki Water Treatment Plant in Laikipia District.

Engineer J. M Maina, Director of Water Services for the Laikipia County Government, at the Nanyuki Water Treatment Plant in Laikipia District.
Nanyuki water and sewerage company is a corporate entity with the mandate of providing water, harvested from Likii Central River, and sanitation services within Nanyuki Municipality and its environs on self sustaining basis where water.

Copenhagen, 7 June, 2016 —The 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) today announced a partnership with Kenya at the Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) Summit in Denmark. The 2030 WRG is a unique public-private-civil society collaboration that aims to close the gap between supply and demand in water-stressed developing countries.

Without urgent action, the gap between global water supply and demand is projected to reach 40 per cent by the year 2030. In Kenya, taking a “business-as-usual” approach to managing its water resources will result in an almost 30% gap between water supply and the water required to meet the country’s development needs. Several areas central to Kenya’s economy, such as the Athi River Basin, are already feeling the effects of water stress.

The partnership between 2030 WRG and Kenya will allow for collaboration on a number of key areas:

expanding access to finance for efficient irrigation; catalyzing partnerships in water stressed catchments; and replicating best practices in urban and industrial water efficiency.

“Ensuring a safe and abundant supply of water is vital to transforming Kenya into an industrialized middle income country,” said Eugene Wamalwa, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Water and Irrigation. “This partnership with the private sector and civil society will help generate solutions to secure water for future generations. A problem shared is a problem halved and solved.”

Kenya Stills

Christine Shikuku, Environmental Officer at Tambuzi Limited, a flower farm located 180km north of Nairobi on the western foothills of Mount Kenya in Laikipia County, a 10,000km² wilderness haven, supporting large numbers of wildlife – many endangered. Tambuzi is the only large scale flower farm in the area which is dominated by small scale farms, each between two and six acres, mostly growing maize, intercropped with beans and potatoes. Tambuzi Ltd. has 25 hectares under horticultural production, with the rest dedicated to sustainable forestry, bee keeping, vegetables and livestock, and is run by Tim and Maggie Hobbs.

“Water is everyone’s lifeblood,” said Vimal Shah, CEO of Bidco Africa, one of Kenya’s leading manufacturers and marketers of consumer goods. “Agricultural processes account for 70% of global water use, so it’s imperative that we address water management in the agribusiness and manufacturing sectors. It is only through ambitious, collective efforts, such as the 2030 Water Resources Group partnership with Kenya, that we will deliver action at the scale needed to address the challenge.”

“The value of energy efficiency is now well known in the industry in Kenya. Water is the next challenge,” said Phyllis Wakiaga, CEO of the Kenya Association of Manufacturers. “Even more than energy, water requires strong engagement between the public and private sector to find solutions where it lacks or where there’s wastage, and this partnership is an important step in that direction.”

“Across the globe, WRG partnerships are helping push the water resources agenda to the forefront of high-level national debate,” said Anders Berntell, 2030 WRG Executive Director. “In Kenya, the appetite for such discussions, and the interest in exploring new approaches is very impressive. This will be critical to ensure Kenya’s sustainable development.”

 

# # #

 

About 3GF

3GF forges international public-private partnerships with the goal of designing and accelerating solutions to intractable problems relating to green growth. It culminates in an annual summit, which is hosted by the Danish Government in collaboration with the governments of China, Kenya, Ethiopia, Mexico, Qatar, Vietnam and Korea. The summit convenes 250-300 global leaders from governments, international organisations, leading businesses, the financial sector and civil society. The theme of this year’s summit is, “A Call to Action –  Enabling Solutions at Speed and at Scale.”

 

Press contacts:

  • Alida Pham, Global Communications Lead, apham@ifc.org, +1 202 603 2535
  • Joy Busolo, Country Representative Kenya, jbusolo@ifc.org, +254 722 226504

Resources:

The Citizen: Learning from Ruaha

News Source: The Citizen

Ruaha_TheCitizenTanzania

The challenge facing the Ruaha is illustrative of the rationale for the establishment of the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) Tanzania Partnership. We bring together stakeholders impacted by water stress, from across the public sector, private sector, and civil society, to find collective solutions that are essential for the management of common resources such as water.

By Will Davies, Onesmo Sigalla, Neema Ndikumwami

Dar es Salaam. It is a testament of the wealth of Tanzania’s environment riches that a national park of 20,000 square kilometers – half the size of the Netherlands – and home to 10,000 elephants, can remain relatively unknown outside of the region. This is the case with the Ruaha National Park.

In fact, even fewer overseas visitors would have heard of the Ruaha were it not for the fact that the Greater Ruaha river, the livelihood of the park, has been drying up. Historically, this 300-mile river would consistently flow year round, but in 1993 the river dried up for the first time for three weeks. By 1999 this had reached three months, and by 2013 dry spells were even being reported even during the wet season.

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Ongoing progress in Bangladesh country engagement

Bangladesh Country Update

Supported by 2030 WRG, the Bangladesh Water Multi-Stakeholder Partnership (MSP), which was established in December 2015, has successfully worked to create strong champions in the Government of Bangladesh (at the policy level), private sector and civil society. Before 2030 WRG started its program in Bangladesh, the Ministry of Water Resources (MoWR) primarily considered flood control and irrigation in its water resources management agenda. Now, increasingly, the MoWR is getting involved in water use efficiency, reuse, resource management and wastewater treatment.

Two ongoing processes in our Bangladesh work include:

Under the Water Governance and Sustainability Work-Stream, a task force has started working on Water Valuation and Incentives in Bangladesh. The purpose of this work is to explore valuation and pricing mechanism based on international best practices and create an incentives framework for better management of water resources including efficiency, re-use and wastewater treatment. The Task Force is led by the MoWR with strong participation from other Government entities, private sector and civil society such the National Board of Revenue, Central Bank, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Bangladesh high-level meetingTechnology, H&M, Nestle and others. A concept note will be presented during next Steering Board Meeting.

2030 WRG is supporting the formulation of the Bangladesh Delta Plan (BDP) 2100 as a partner with the Government of Bangladesh, Government of Netherlands and the World Bank Group. The BDP 2100 will identify and prioritize infrastructure investments (in water resources, energy, transport and other sectors) to ensure sustainable development of the Bangladesh Delta. The 2030 WRG is supporting the Investment Plan team to identify PPP opportunities in the water sector. The investment plan is expected to play a complimentary role to the Bangladesh Water MSP to identify private sector investment opportunities and improve the investment climate for private sector investments in water infrastructure.

 

Expanding our reach: 2030 WRG current scoping missions

World Map ScopingIn an effort to further expand our reach beyond our current scope, we are currently scouting other potential countries where our partnerships could help countries achieve a water-secure future. In Latin America, a comparative analysis recommended pursuing the scoping in Sao Paulo state (Brazil) and Colombia. A comparative analysis in Africa recommended pursuing the scoping process in Zambia and Ethiopia. Finally, in Asia, a scoping process will be conducted in Vietnam.

Before engaging in a new country, 2030 WRG has developed a set of country selection criteria as part of its scoping process. The first part of the process involves a background due diligence analysis of the countries being considered, consulting with many of our partners in the process, in order to fully understand risks and opportunities and the potential for a successful outcome of our engagement in the country. A more detailed scoping report then summarizes the research and analysis, focusing on aspects related to political economy, social context, hydrological context, key water institutions, key private sector partners, and international cooperation projects, as those factors influence the likely success of our new engagements.

A comprehensive stakeholder mapping follows to better understand who the critical actors are. Based on this exercise, we conduct an in-country scoping mission to meet with key local stakeholders, to understand the challenges and opportunities of the local water sector, identify key thematic areas of the water sector — which could be the focus of future multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) and working groups –, and to assess whether the 2030 WRG approach is suitable for a specific context. This entails listening to the needs of government, the private sector (in particular the companies that are consuming water) and civil society in order to jointly develop solutions to the water challenges.

2030 WRG Develops Mine Water Management Program in Mongolia

Mongolia Country Update

Mongolia MiningOn the basis of a recently concluded hydro-economic assessment of the mining sector in Mongolia, 2030 WRG is developing a regional mining program to incentivize better water management in Mongolia’s mining industry. The hydro-economic analysis focused on water demand reduction and water supply augmentation options for the Tavan Tolgoi and Shivee Ovoo regions of Mongolia. It highlighted surface water transfers as more expensive solutions compared with demand-side management options, and in some cases, groundwater use.

Through a series of awareness building workshops on the analysis, 2030 WRG has built capacity of government, private sector and civil society stakeholders on cost-benefit tools for water decision-making and effective water governance. Stakeholders recognized the value of the analysis for prioritization of technical solutions.

Mark Newby, Environmental Manager, Oyu Tolgoi, one of the biggest mining sites in the country, termed the analysis as a “paradigm shift” in Mongolian stakeholders’ understanding of possible water solutions.

Mongolia’s water demand is expected to exceed supply capacity before the year 2021 (PwC-2030 Water Resources Group Analysis, 2014). The South Gobi mining cluster is already experiencing water stress, with the mining industry (at 12.7% of current demand) poised to emerge as the biggest water user in the future.

Eight Mongolian mining companies, part of the IFC Mining Roundtable supported by 2030 WRG, have recently adopted a Voluntary Code of Practice for better water management. Read more about this Code of Practice here.

2030 WRG is currently engaging with mining companies, government stakeholders, and civil society organizations to design multi-stakeholder solutions to the challenge of the mine-water nexus. Such solutions will include a combine of regulatory, institutional, and technical changes to optimize water efficiency at mine operations and minimize wastewater.