2030 WRG in the News

East African Business Week: River protection starts in Tanzania

News Source: East African Business Week

By Timothy Kitundu, Monday, June 20th, 2016

DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA – A major multi-stakeholder initiative to improve water management in the Great Ruaha River has been launched during a recent workshop to review supply and demand challenges in the catchment area. 

The Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign (GRRC) brings together stakeholders impacted by water stress from across the public sector, private sector and civil society, to find collective solutions to water challenges in the basin.

The Rufiji Basin Water Board in collaboration with CEO Round Table of Tanzania, SAGCOT Centre, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Tanzania and 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) Tanzania Partnership held the workshop in Iringa town (500km from Dar es Salaam) to review and endorse the concept of the initiative.

The GRRC will be based on the long-awaited Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub-basin. This plan, promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and other resources.

The plan, led by Tanzania’s Ministry of Water and Irrigation with the Rufiji Basin Water Board, aims to bring about a cultural change in the way water is managed and used in a sustainable way.

“This Campaign will unite stakeholders in a co-ordinated, action-oriented coalition to find solutions to the basin’s water challenges,” said Onesmo Sigalla 2030 WRG Country Representative.

He also added that that the campaign aimed to enable the private sector to work alongside government and civil society groups to identify, discuss and address current and future water supply and demand challenges.

The campaign will share lessons from effective water stewardship projects inside or outside the catchment in order to promote, replicate and scale-up successful initiatives. This will be accompanied by project proposal development, financing, implementation and monitoring support.

The ‘collective action’ approach of the discussions to kick-start the initiative was endorsed by Eng. Emmanuel Kalobelo, Assistant Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, when launching the Campaign.

He observed: ‘Business caHe further commended 2030 WRG for mobilising stakeholders to develop credible interventions and coordinate existing plans to restore the flow of the Great Ruaha.

The Great Ruaha River Catchment is of high significance to the national economy. The region contains 50% of the country’s installed hydropower. In addition it hosts the largest National Park in the country with the largest number of Elephants (up to 20,000), highest number of bird species (about 4,000 species) and a steadily growing tourist turnover.

All Africa: Tanzania – Plans Underway to Boost Water Catchment Areas

News Source: allAfrica (Tanzania Daily News)

A major multi stakeholder initiative to improve water management in the Great Ruaha River has been launched to review supply and demand challenges in the catchment area, which is a vital part of the national economy.

According to a statement, the Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign (GRRC) brings together stakeholders impacted by water stress from across the public sector, private sector and civil society, to find collective solutions to water challenges in the basin.

The initiative, led by the 2030 Water Resources Group (WRG) in partnership with the Ministry of Water and Irrigation and the Rufiji Basin Water Board, aims to bring about a cultural change in the way water is managed and used in a sustainable way.

“This campaign will unite stakeholders in a coordinated, action-oriented coalition to find solutions to the basin’s water challenges,” the 2030 WRG Country Representative, Mr Onesmo Sigalla said.

The Rufiji Basin Water Board in collaboration with CEO Round Table of Tanzania, SAGCOT Centre, World Wildlife Fund Tanzania and 2030 WRG Tanzania Partnership held a workshop recently in Iringa town to review and endorse the concept of the initiative.

The GRRC will be based on the long-awaited Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub-basin. This plan promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and other resources.

Mr Sigalla said that the campaign aimed at enabling the private sector to work alongside government and civil society groups to identify, discuss and address current and future water supply and demand challenges.

The campaign will share lessons from effective water stewardship projects inside or outside the catchment in order to promote, replicate and scale-up successful initiatives. This will be accompanied by project proposal development, financing, implementation and monitoring support.

The ‘collective action’ approach of the discussions to kick-start the initiative was endorsed by Eng Emmanuel Kalobelo, the Assistant Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, when launching the campaign.

He observed: “Business can play a major role by being a key voice in the debate alongside government, civil society and academia,” Eng Kalobelo reflected that every person living in Tanzania has now witnessed water stress and has ‘a story to tell’ about its effects. He further commended 2030 WRG for mobilising stakeholders to develop credible interventions and coordinate existing plans to restore the flow of the Great Ruaha.

The 2-day launch event in Iringa town identified the interests and capacities of more than 70 stakeholders. The emerging campaign leadership will now work with supporters to determine priority action areas and working groups.

The 2030 Water Resources Group is a unique, public-private-civil society collaboration that facilitates open, trust-based dialogue processes to drive action on water resources reform in water stressed countries in developing economies.

The ultimate aim of such reforms and actions is to close the gap between water demand and supply by the year 2030. The 2030 WRG emerged in 2009 through a collaboration between the IFC, the World Economic Forum, multilateral and bilateral agencies (Swiss and Swedish Development Cooperation), private sector companies (Nestlé, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, SABMiller), and other organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund.

The Rufiji Integrated Water Resources Management and Development Plan for the Great Ruaha sub basin were compiled to inform the discussions of the 2030 WRG and support the Great Ruaha Restoration Campaign.

The plan, presented to the Ministry of Water and Irrigation, has assessed the resource availability and demand both in historic time and future projection to 2035. The plan indicates five strategic focus areas: water for social development, water for economic development, disaster risk management, environmental conservation and water governance.

The Guardian (IPP Media): Setting a new catchment-level to restore the Great Ruaha

News Source: The Guardian (IPP Media)

 

THE Great Ruaha River and its catchment area are critical to Tanzania’s economy.

By DEO MFUGALE

The catchment has the potential to produce 50 per cent of Tanzania’s installed hydroelectric power and accounts for about 40 per cent of rice produced in the country, not to mention some of the highest food-producing regions in the country – Mbeya, Njombe and Iringa.

 

Read the rest of the article >>

 

 

 

The Citizen: Learning from Ruaha

News Source: The Citizen

Ruaha_TheCitizenTanzania

The challenge facing the Ruaha is illustrative of the rationale for the establishment of the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG) Tanzania Partnership. We bring together stakeholders impacted by water stress, from across the public sector, private sector, and civil society, to find collective solutions that are essential for the management of common resources such as water.

By Will Davies, Onesmo Sigalla, Neema Ndikumwami

Dar es Salaam. It is a testament of the wealth of Tanzania’s environment riches that a national park of 20,000 square kilometers – half the size of the Netherlands – and home to 10,000 elephants, can remain relatively unknown outside of the region. This is the case with the Ruaha National Park.

In fact, even fewer overseas visitors would have heard of the Ruaha were it not for the fact that the Greater Ruaha river, the livelihood of the park, has been drying up. Historically, this 300-mile river would consistently flow year round, but in 1993 the river dried up for the first time for three weeks. By 1999 this had reached three months, and by 2013 dry spells were even being reported even during the wet season.

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Daily News: Initiative to tackle Arusha’s water challenges launched

News Source: Daily News

DAILY NEWS REPORTER

A MAJOR Water Stewardship Leadership Forum, held in Arusha, has seen the launch of new initiatives to tackle the region’s spiralling water challenges.

The multi-stakeholder Kilimanjaro Water Stewardship Platform provides organisations from across the public sector, private sector and civil society with a mechanism to develop, coordinate and scale up solutions to tackle the growing water resource challenges in the Pangani River Basin.

It was formally launched by the Minister of Water and Irrigation Gerson Lwenge together with Mr Anders Berntell, Executive Director of the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG).

“I am particularly inspired that there is a deliberate effort to engage the private sector in managing water resources,” Lwenge said, adding that he was passionate about the Platform’s collective action approach. The landmark forum also included a master-class for water leaders from across Africa.

The three day regional event drew upon lessons generated by innovative work undertaken by Diageo and Serengeti Breweries Limited to implement ‘the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) standard’ which represents international best practice on water management – at their Moshi site.

The platform is designed to promote practical solutions in areas such as increasing the productivity of water use in agriculture, developing and scaling up partnerships for improved catchment management, and promoting the uptake of the AWS stewardship standards.

The initiative’s co-ordinator, Onesmo Sigalla, was equally supportive of setting a progressive agenda to maximise water stewardship’s contribution to sustainable development by joining businesses with government and civil society efforts.

“The launch of this platform is critical to ensure that economic growth in the region is not constrained by water security issues, and to demonstrate the potential for the private sector to drive wider sustainable water stewardship,” said Sigalla.

The Leadership Forum highlighted specific water stewardship efforts in the region, including implementation of the AWS Standard by Serengeti Breweries, with support from Shahidi wa Maji, Water Witness International, and the Scottish Government.

This work is helping the company to manage the water and climate risks facing their brewery and its supply chain. The implementation of the new standard was used as a hands-on case study at a ‘Water Stewardship Masterclass’, an advanced training for practitioners, held during the event.

Sustainability and Responsibility Manager for Serengeti Breweries Limited, Ms Hawa Ladha underlined the company’s commitment to the initiative and explained: “By being one of the first African companies to implement the AWS’ Standard we are making a strong, public commitment towards the need for better water management in the region”. Almost twenty organisations have already indicated their commitment to actively participate.

Founding members include the Pangani Basin Water Board, Tanzania Horticulture Association (TAHA), 2030 WRG and the International Water Stewardship Programme (IWASP).

The Pangani River Basin is home to a large number of commercial agriculture producers (in particular coffee and sugar) and has the largest concentration of horticulture and floriculture producers in Tanzania – with over 30 companies in the region identified as exporting to European markets.

The Pangani is also globally recognised for its forest and biodiversity resources which generates an estimated US$50 million alone in revenue each year for the Tanzanian economy. The river basin is already water stressed, and evidence suggests its resources will become increasingly constrained.

 

The Citizen: Arusha in fresh drive to protect Pangani River basin

Tanzania Clipping_TheCitizen_16.04.21News Source: The Citizen

Arusha, April, 21, 2016 – Climate change and over exploitation of water resources is challenging the sustainability of the Pangani River Basin to deliver the precious liquid to consumers. Competition for diminishing water resources has led to tensions between various stakeholders within the basin.

The regional authorities, development partners and stakeholders have responded to this crisis by launching a special project to tackle it. It was launched at the end of a three-day water stewardship leadership forum which ended here on Tuesday. Dubbed Kilimanjaro Water Stewardship Platform, the multi-stakeholders project is a catalyst for improved collaboration between the business community, the government and civil societies to improve water security in the region.

The forum brought together experts on water stewardship from various countries around the continent, government officials, civil societies and other stakeholders who dis-cussed how water can be better man-aged to secure inclusive economic growth, and the role of stewardship in business strategies and operations. According to the organizers, the newly launched project will provide public institutions and civil societies with a mechanism to develop, coordinate and scale up solutions to tackle the spiraling water resource challenges in Pangani River basin.

The Kilimanjaro Water Steward-ship Platform was formally launched by the minister for Water and Irrigation, Mr Gerson Lwenge. Also in attendance was Mr Anders Berntell, the executive director of the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG). The platform is designed to pro-mote practical solutions in areas such as increasing the productivity of water use in agriculture, developing and scaling up partnerships for improved catchment management, and promoting the uptake of the AWS stewardship standards.

At least 20 organizations have so far shown interest to join forces with the government in the crucial under-taking. Founding members include Pangani Basin Water Board, Tanzania Horticulture Association, 2030 WRG and International Water Stewardship Programme (IWASP).

Times of India: White Paper on urban wastewater PPPs released (ANI)

News source: ANI

New Delhi, Apr. 6 (ANI): Secretary of Ministry of Water Resources, Ganga Rejuvenation and River Development, Shashi Cover FICCI_WRG_UrbanWastewaterPPPWhitpaperShekhar, today released a white paper on Urban Wastewater PPPs, prepared by the FICCI Water Mission and 2030 Water Resources Group.

He launched the white paper at the India Water Week 2016, in an interactive seminar, jointly organized by FICCI and the Ministry of Water Resources on “Model for Efficient Water Management at Local Level in Urban / Peri-Urban Areas.

Launching the paper, Shekhar remarked “what we have launched today is what we plan to do in Ganga.”

In his endorsement of the FICCI – 2030 Water Resources Group White Paper, the Secretary mentioned that it “provides useful industry perspectives on measures to improve the investment climate and enhance project viability and sustainability through wastewater reuse markets in the long run.”

Developed as a joint collaboration between the FICCI Water Mission and the 2030 Water Resources Group (2030 WRG), the Paper advocates for governments, both at the national and state levels, to focus on improvement in the quality of sewerage services in the country through Public-Private (Community) Partnerships (PP(C)P), over and above private sector participation as a means to bridge the investment gap.

The outcome of extensive stakeholder consultations with industry participants, water and wastewater utilities, government agencies and financiers, the Paper recommends a three level payment security mechanism which involves ring fencing of sewerage revenues at the local government/state utility level, followed by funding support from the state government through a separate State Sanitation Fund, and backstopped by a guarantee facility from the Government of India. It also suggests that the country needs to move to a regime where sewerage charges at least cover O&M expenses.

Naina Lal Kidwai, Chairman, FICCI Water Mission highlighted that “the White Paper aims to serve as a valuable resource for assessing current constraints faced by PPP projects and developing innovative ways of creating a conducive investment climate for private sector involvement in the sewerage sector.”

Co-chairing the session on “Model for Efficient Water Management at Local Level in Urban / Peri-Urban Areas, Pradeep Puri, Chairman, IL&FS Water Ltd. & Chairman, FICCI National Executive Committee on Urban Infrastructure and Smart Cities, remarked, “probably no other aspect of urban infrastructure is more mismanaged than water distribution where we compare very poorly with international benchmarks in terms of efficiency, per capita availability and water tarrifs.” (ANI)

To download the report, click here >>

 

CCTV America: Interview with 2030 WRG on importance of improved water infrastructure

News Source: CCTV America

CCTV America_InterviewAnders_WWD2016_WaterInfrastInvestm

Washington DC, 22 March, 2016 – CCTV America’s Rachelle Akkufo interviewed Anders Berntell, Executive Director of the 2030 Water Resources Group about the current situation of water infrastructure on the occasion of World Water Day.

Read more: http://www.cctv-america.com/2016/03/22/flint-michigan-continues-to-pick-up-pieces-after-lead-water-crisis#ixzz45HCs6tWw

To see the recording please click here >>

To see the recording on Youtube, please click here >>

WaterSan Perspective: Water Man of India Urges Disciplined Use of Water in Africa

NEWS SOURCE: WaterSan Perspective

Fredrick Mugira
March 11, 2016

South Africa’s extreme drought has dried up water supplies for millions of people living in rural parts of the country. Some of the affected people live in Mpumalanga, a rural province in the eastern part of the country. In Mpumalanga, the drought has led to vanishing of water in Crocodile River, forcing water officials in Mbombela municipality – the main city of Mpumalanga – to start implementing water restriction to consumers targeting swimming pools and vehicle washing bays according to Linda Carol Zulu, the municipality’s general manager for water and sanitation.

Water suppliers in Mbombela municipality rely on the Crocodile River for water, but due to the drought – the worst in 30 years – river flows have plummeted this season.

Drying up of rivers, wells, springs and lakes in Africa is not new. Several lakes including Lake Chad, the formerly world’s 6th largest lake have had a rapid decline leading to water shortfall. In fact in Africa, one in three people endure water scarcity and this is being worsened by climate change.

Similarly, in Uganda, over 100 shallow wells, streams, rivers and lakes have dried up in the south western region in the last five years according to the region’s focal person for the national environment watchdog – NEMA, Jeconeous Musingwire. Eastern Africa countries like Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania are suffering even worse problems.

But in some parts of India, things are a bit different. And this difference is a result of Dr. Rajendra Singh efforts.

The water conservationist and the 2015 Stockholm Water Prize winner, Dr Rajendra, has been recognized for his innovative water restoration efforts and steady attempts to improve water security in villages of India.

He shared his thoughts with Fredrick Mugira about replicating the same innovative water restoration efforts in Africa to improve water security in the continent’s villages. This was during the week-long knowledge exchange organised by the 2030 Water Resource Group (2030 WRG), a global public-private-civil society partnership based in Washington USA in collaboration with Stockholm International Water Institute and the Water and Sanitation Department of South Africa.

Dr. Rajendra was one of the water activists, professionals and authorities from India, Bangladesh, Kenya, Mexico, Mongolia, Peru, Tanzania and South Africa that took part in this knowledge exchange in Pretoria, South Africa last week.

[An edited transcript of the interview follows.]

Question: Why should people care about Rivers in their communities?

Answer: The people should understand that if their river is not healthy, they also can’t live healthy. So the health of a river and the health of people are interlinked. So the people should try the rejuvenation of the river and they make it a clean river and they should safeguard the river land and the clean flow. This way they get clean water.

Question: Several rivers, lakes and wells in Africa are drying up as a result of climate change. What should be done to stop this?

Answer: You know what is very important is water conservation and harvesting and also making a decent use of water. If they can make a disciplined use of water so they can conserve and make a sustainable way of water management and a sustainable way of water resource management.
So if we can get success in Rajasthan, so that model can be replicated in Africa. The same model we can replicate. On one hand we start with realization of the community and on other hand, we get social corporate responsibility and also government intervention. So change is possible.

Question: Who should bear this responsibility?

Answer: The people and the government, and the private sector should all realize the responsibility of cleaning the river. You know the most important are the local people. The local community should realize the site selection of the work for the water harvesting, reduce corruption, and reduce the pollution, and reduce the wastage of the money and the wastage of resource. So it is very much necessary that the community takes the lead of that work.

Question: Will water-stressed communities in developing countries ever have enough water?

Answer: You know the rain water is enough for the world but we are not really managing it properly. If we can manage this water in a good way, we can create prosperity and peace. You know now, the scarcity of water and the flashfloods create tension within communities and that tension creates conflict and that conflict makes the situation of war. So now the third world war is coming if we are not doing the water conservation and water harvesting and disciplined use of water. So if we are really to have a prosperous and peaceful common future, we should start the community driven decentralized water management now. You know the one water, one planet slogan? The community should start this. The community role is very important. If the community starts that work, the government follows and the private sector also comes in.

Question: I understand you are organizing a river walk in Mumbai, India that is likely to attract over 10,000 people to walk for 5km alongside the four rivers of Mumbai. How will these rivers benefit from the walk?

Answer: The river walk is a practical involvement of all stakeholders of the river. So after this walk, we make GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) and the rejuvenation starts. (GPR is geophysical method that uses radar pulses to image the subsurface. It can be used in the detection of voids and incoherence in hydraulic defense structures such as river embankments and levee systems.)

Question: When will you walk for rivers in Africa?

Answer: I am very much interested in holding water walk in Africa but African communities should initiate this. I am coming. I can join and help in mobilization and organization and we can make a system for river rejuvenation. I can come.

All Africa: South Africa – Groundwater an Option to Current Water Crisis

News Source: ALLAFRICA

Pretoria — South Africans must consider using groundwater on a grand scale to augment the fast diminishing surface water, says Director General of the Department of Water and Sanitation, Margaret-Ann Diedricks.

Speaking at a conference of the Water Resources Group (WRG) on Thursday, Diedricks said there was an overreliance on surface water at the expense of groundwater that could play a pivotal role to alleviate South Africa’s water woes.

The five-day conference is held under theme ‘2030 WRG Knowledge Exchange’ to develop partnerships that can assist governments to accelerate actions and increase water sustainability and efficiency.

It also raises awareness about water scarcity challenges and to find possible solutions among high level decision-makers, as well as to support in-country activities.

Diedricks told delegates from East Africa, India, Mongolia, Bangladesh, Peru and Mexico that South Africa, together with its neighbours, is experiencing the difficulties of climate change through the drought that has destroyed crops and livestock in its wake since 2014.

“There has to be definite change of mind-set with regards to the general overreliance on surface water, while there is an abundance of groundwater that can be used for basic needs,” said Diedricks.

She said the use of recycled water for industries and irrigation would go a long way towards helping to supplement surface water that had been dried up by the drought.

“There were no ready-made solutions to the current water crisis but countries had to adapt,” she said.

Diedricks’s statement comes three years after delegates, who attended a groundwater conference in Durban, heard that more than 420 towns in the country were largely dependent on groundwater and 80% of rural villages were dependent entirely on this rare water resource.

From a groundwater governance point of view, municipalities lack the human resource capacity to effectively implement groundwater governance provisions.

Renewable groundwater

Groundwater specialist at the WRC, Dr Shafick Adams, estimated that the total volume of available renewable groundwater is between 10 – 343 million m3/annum (7 500 million m3/annum under drought conditions).

Current use is estimated between 2 000 – 4 000 million m3/annum.

Adams maintained that groundwater, if managed correctly, had the potential to significantly add to the country’s water supply mix. He also argued that it was wrong for groundwater to be treated as a step-sister to surface water as the two complement each other.

“Groundwater is fairly cheap and fast to develop. Most of the groundwater is of potable quality and the areas where qualities are below standards have been mapped.

“In addition, groundwater can reduce the strain of high water demand from surface water resource, either as a sole supply source or by way of augmenting the already out stripped surface resources,” said Adams.

Zama Siqalala of the Strategic Water Partners Network said the agriculture industry is the biggest consumer of water in South Africa yet it contributed a mere 3% to the country’s GDP.

“It is about time that the industry resorted to the water use efficiency principles in order to minimise its water use,” said Siqalala.